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'''The Mission'''
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The mission of this site is to archive both historical and current information on asylums across the United States and around the world.
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<div style="font-size:162%; border:none; margin:0; padding:.1em; color:#000;">Welcome to Asylum Projects,</div>
'''The Statement'''
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<div style="top:+0.2em; font-size:95%;">A historic asylum wiki anyone can edit.</div>
 
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<div style="width:100%; text-align:center; font-size:85%;">[[Special:Statistics|{{NUMBEROFARTICLES}}]] articles and counting</div>
This site is dedicated to the history of asylums in all forms. The term of asylum is applied to not only what is commonly thought of: mental hospitals, but can also be applied to sanitariums, state training schools, reform schools, orphanages, and in a limited form prisons. These institutions have and continue to play a major part in today's society.
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Everyone throughout the United States and in many other countries has in one way or another felt the touch of these institutions. These places have both directly and indirectly affected people and their families. They have shaped lives and created many popular myths about them.
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<div style="font-size:250%; border:none; margin:0; padding:.1em; color:#000;">We need your help!</div>
With all that in mind, this site was created to help in the historical research of any institutions that can be classified as an asylum. It was created for both serious researchers, those who are doing genealogical research, and people with an interest in asylums.
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<div style="font-size:100%; border:none; margin:0; padding:.1em; color:#000;">[[AsylumProjects:To do list|Click here to find out how to help.]]</div>
 
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'''Please note: This is a developmental version of Asylum Projects and is not the main database.  If you were looking for the main Asylum Projects please go [http://www.asylumprojects.org/tiki-index.php here].'''
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| style="font-size:95%; padding:10px 0; margin:0; text-align:left; white-space:nowrap; color:#000;" | [[AsylumProjects:About|Overview]]&nbsp;'''·''' [[AsylumProjects:Tutorial|Editing]]&nbsp;'''·''' [[Help:Contents|Help]]&nbsp;'''·''' [[Help:Managing files|How To Upload Images]]
*For admins: This is the [[AP:Todo|to do list]] of things that need to be done.  Add things/reorganize it as you guys think of something.
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[[Special:AWCforum|Message Boards]]&nbsp;'''·''' [[:Category:Asylum Books|Books]]&nbsp;'''·''' [[:Category:Articles With Videos|Videos]]
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Revision as of 15:36, 4 November 2010

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Welcome to Asylum Projects,
A historic asylum wiki anyone can edit.
2,187 articles and counting
We need your help!
Overview · Editing · Help · How To Upload Images

Message Boards · Books · Videos

Mission Statement


MainPage Image2.jpg

The Mission

The mission of this site is to archive both historical and current information on asylums across the United States and around the world.

The Statement

This site is dedicated to the history of asylums in all forms. The term of asylum is applied to not only what is commonly thought of: mental hospitals, but can also be applied to sanatoriums, state training schools, reform schools, almshouses, and orphanages. These institutions have and continue to play a major part in today's society.

Everyone throughout the United States and in many other countries has in one way or another felt the touch of these institutions. These places have both directly and indirectly affected people and their families. They have shaped lives and created many popular myths about them.

With all that in mind, this site was created to help in the historical research of any institutions that can be classified as an asylum. It was created for both serious researchers, those who are doing genealogical research, and people with an interest in asylums.

Featured Article Of The Week

Binghamton State Hospital


BinghamptonB.jpg

Built in 1858, the castle originally served as the country's first inebriate asylum. Founder J. Edward Turner belonged to a school of thought that alcoholism wasn't just a vice, but could be cured medically. The well-lit rooms and extensive grounds are an important marker in New York State's view of addiction. The asylum was the first of its kind in the country, but only served its original purpose for 15 years, at which point Turner's inebriate asylum was converted into a hospital for the chronically insane. The asylum faced financial woes for a decade after a great fire broke out in March 1870. Gov. Lucius Robinson deemed it a “complete failure” in 1879, suggesting that the asylum be closed down and renovated to house the insane. In 1881, its doors were reopened as the Binghamton Asylum for the Chronic Insane, later renamed the Binghamton State Hospital. Hundreds of patients were transferred to Binghamton from Utica, Poughkeepsie and Middletown; those patients lived, suffered and died in the palatial asylum. Treatment methods only worsened with the turn of the century.

In 1942, the hospital instituted electric shock therapy, hydrotherapy and later lobotomy as methods of treatment for the mentally ill. These “treatments” were nothing short of brutally inhumane. Patients were restrained in wet canvas for up to six hours at a time and forced into seizures by means of electric shock. The worst and most terrifying of these treatments was the prefrontal lobotomy, a form of psychosurgery that involved scrambling the frontal lobe of the brain with a sharp metal instrument inserted through the upper eye socket. Click here for more...

Featured Image Of The Week

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By 1900, the Poor House, now known as County Home, no longer had to care for the blind, those with mental illness or for children. But it faced a growing number of occupants, especially as Syracuse's population soared toward 20,000. And there were always sick, frail and even pregnant residents. Various rooms were designated over time as infirmary wards but always proved deficient. Pressed by local physicians and the state, the country finally relented and erected a 60-bed hospital for the site in 1900. It marked a key transformation in the history of "The Home" and of local public care for the indigent.

Featured Video

A video documentary done on Kings Park State Hospital and it's closing by the Kings Park Historical Society.

Recent Message Board Posts

Hello,

In this space you normally would see our forum. This had been a hold over from earlier days before we had a Facebook page. Just prior to our server issues regular users had been barely using the forum with the majority of new posts from anonymous users asking genealogy questions or spammers. The old forum software does not work with our new version while the new forum software does not carry over old comments to the new forum. As a result, the forum will be discontinued in favor of our Facebook page. If you have questions or comments you can ask them there.

Asylum Projects Facebook Page
If you have genealogical question here is an information page to help you.

Upcoming Events Calendar

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Asylum News   (news you can edit!)

February 7, 2016 Clarinda struggles to fill former hospital

The 128-year-old former mental health institute in the small southwest Iowa city of Clarinda isn’t your typical real estate opportunity, and so far no one is rushing to move in. More than seven months after the state closed the Clarinda Mental Health Institute, much of the sprawling building remains empty, including entire floors that haven’t been used in decades.

February 1, 2016 Efforts continue to preserve other parts of former Peoria State Hospital grounds

Christina Morris happily remembers Sunday morning breakfasts with her grandparents, followed by visits to the peaceful cemeteries on the grounds of the Peoria State Hospital, where some family members are buried. “My interest with the state hospital started when I was about 7 years old,” Morris said in a recent interview. “When I would come onto the grounds (my grandfather) would say that this was a place of special people. (By special) I thought he meant giants, because these buildings were so big and beautiful and immaculate to me. I just was enamored by how beautiful it was.”

January 7, 2016 That Time The United States Sterilized 60,000 Of Its Citizens

Not too long ago, more than 60,000 people were sterilized in the United States based on eugenic laws. Most of these operations were performed before the 1960s in institutions for the so-called “mentally ill” or “mentally deficient.” In the early 20th century across the country, medical superintendents, legislators, and social reformers affiliated with an emerging eugenics movement joined forces to put sterilization laws on the books.

January, 6, 2016 Pa. hires firm to develop plan for Harrisburg State Hospital site

Harrisburg, PA-The state has hired a Lancaster planning company to help it figure out what to do with the former Harrisburg State Hospital, which closed 10 years ago. Since closing in 2006, the hospital complex has housed state workers from the state police, Department of General Services and the Department of Human Services. It is now part of the larger DGS Annex property, which encompasses 303 acres across Harrisburg and Susquehanna Township.