Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

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{{FAformat
|Title= Whitby Psychiatric Hospital
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|Title= Gartnavel Royal Hospital
|Image= Whitadmin.jpg
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|Image= gartnavel5.png
 
|Width= 150px
 
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|Body=  In 1911, the architect, James Govan, working with a team of advisory psychiatrists, physicians and government officials, presented his design for the Whitby Hospital. Govan's design called for a series of 16 cottages, each housing approximately 70 patients, situated in a village-like setting amongst winding treed avenues. While the exterior design of the cottages was strongly influenced by German architecture, any other similarity stopped there. Canadian physicians worked closely with their architect to make sure the Whitby Hospital would offer a calmer and more humane atmosphere for patients than other institutions they had seen in their travels. The buildings must be situated in such a way, said the physicians, that all wards in all cottages receive some form of direct sunlight, even during the shortest days. An overhead view of the site plan indicates that Govan did exactly that. The main group of cottages faced south west, slightly back from the shore of Lake Ontario.
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|Body=  The Committee of Management of the Glasgow Lunatic Asylum was formed in 1804. Construction of the Asylum commenced in 1810 and was completed in 1814. Originally opened as the Glasgow Lunatic Asylum in 1814 in the Cowcaddens area of Glasgow, it became the Glasgow Royal Lunatic Asylum in 1824. In 1843 the Asylum moved to new premises at Gartnavel which, like the previous buildings, were designed to facilitate segregation both by gender and social class. Substantial extensions were added in 1877, 1937 and 1959. In 1824 a royal charter was obtained, in 1931 the Glasgow Royal Lunatic Asylum was renamed the Glasgow Royal Mental Hospital and the present name was adopted in 1963. Construction of the adjacent Gartnavel General Hospital commenced in 1968 and as a result some sports and recreational facilities of the psychiatric hospital were lost.
  
In the initial building stages, prisoners from nearby Central Prison supplied much of the labor. During later stages of construction, paid laborers and mechanics worked for wages ranging from $0.55 to $1.00 per hour. To ease the transfer of building materials from the local railway station a mile to the north east, workers built a narrow gauge trunk-line across several fields of pasture into the construction site.  [[Whitby Psychiatric Hospital|Click here for more...]]
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Towards the end of the nineteenth century the proportion of pauper lunatics at Gartnavel began to decline as parochial asylums came into being. After its transfer to the National Health Service Gartnavel continued to have a substantial proportion of paying patients. Industrial/occupational therapy was formally introduced in 1922 and a psycho–geriatric unit was established in 1972. From 1948 until 1968 Gartnavel had its own Board of Management for Glasgow Royal Mental Hospital.  [[Gartnavel Royal Hospital|Click here for more...]]
 
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Revision as of 04:15, 24 May 2020

Featured Article Of The Week

Gartnavel Royal Hospital


gartnavel5.png

The Committee of Management of the Glasgow Lunatic Asylum was formed in 1804. Construction of the Asylum commenced in 1810 and was completed in 1814. Originally opened as the Glasgow Lunatic Asylum in 1814 in the Cowcaddens area of Glasgow, it became the Glasgow Royal Lunatic Asylum in 1824. In 1843 the Asylum moved to new premises at Gartnavel which, like the previous buildings, were designed to facilitate segregation both by gender and social class. Substantial extensions were added in 1877, 1937 and 1959. In 1824 a royal charter was obtained, in 1931 the Glasgow Royal Lunatic Asylum was renamed the Glasgow Royal Mental Hospital and the present name was adopted in 1963. Construction of the adjacent Gartnavel General Hospital commenced in 1968 and as a result some sports and recreational facilities of the psychiatric hospital were lost.

Towards the end of the nineteenth century the proportion of pauper lunatics at Gartnavel began to decline as parochial asylums came into being. After its transfer to the National Health Service Gartnavel continued to have a substantial proportion of paying patients. Industrial/occupational therapy was formally introduced in 1922 and a psycho–geriatric unit was established in 1972. From 1948 until 1968 Gartnavel had its own Board of Management for Glasgow Royal Mental Hospital. Click here for more...