Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

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|Title= New Jersey Sanitorium for Tuberculosis Diseases
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|Title= Broughton Hospital
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|Body= In 1907, New Jersey opened its only state owned and operated sanatorium in Glen Gardner. It was intended to be a model institution, providing individual and public health benefits to an expected 500 case annually. Described at the time as “largely educational in character, which would give a practical demonstration of up-to-date methods of treating .... tuberculosis”, the facility treated more than 10,000 between 1907 and 1929.
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|Body= In 1850, Dorothea Dix persuaded the General Assembly to appropriate money for a state-run psychiatric hospital in Raleigh. By 1875, an estimated 700 North Carolinians were classified as “insane” and not receiving proper care. One hospital thus proved insufficient to meet the needs of the State’s mentally ill. Therefore, on March 20, 1875, the General Assembly voted to provide $75,000 to establish a second state hospital. Four western North Carolina cities, Statesville, Hickory, Asheville, and Morganton, competed to become the home for the institution that was to be known in its early years as the Western North Carolina Insane Asylum. Morganton was selected.
  
The sanatorium's mission was broadened and the effects of long-term care assessed by the 1920s. The scope was broadened to incorporate cases in all levels of severity, regardless of the original intention to only treat "incipients, or 'curables'". The sanatorium's treatment remained reatively unchanged until the middle of the twentieth century when medication became the prevailing treatment. In 1950, the sanatorium broaden it's scope once again, but this to to include all chest diseases, and the name was changed to the New Jersey Hospital for Chest Diseases.
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Gifts and purchases resulted in 263 acres being acquired by the State in 1875. Work began almost immediately. As an economy measure, 50 convicts were released from penitentiaries and brought to Morganton to help make bricks for the hospital’s first building. The brick contractor was responsible for the feeding, safekeeping, and return of the convicts. Realizing that the building under construction would not provide adequate space and due to insufficient funding to expand its size, the General Assembly appropriated an additional $60,000 in 1877 for another wing. Five years later, in December 1882, the Avery Building and its south wing were completed. Dr. Patrick Livingston Murphy was hired as the first superintendent, a position in which he served for 25 years.  [[Broughton Hospital|Click here for more...]]
 
 
In 1977, the hospital changed its name again to the Senator Garret W. Hagedorn Gero-Psychiatric Hospital as it focused on its new calling as a state nursing home and eventually a 288-bed psychiatric hospital. The hospital’s premier location high up on a mountaintop with 600 acres of provided inpatient, comprehensive psychiatric treatment for adult patients. The hospital stated as its mission “to provide quality interdisciplinary psychiatric services that maximize potential and community reintegration within a safe and caring environment. [[New Jersey Sanitorium for Tuberculosis Diseases|Click here for more...]]
 
 
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Latest revision as of 04:04, 20 November 2022

Featured Article Of The Week

Broughton Hospital


Brosh.jpg

In 1850, Dorothea Dix persuaded the General Assembly to appropriate money for a state-run psychiatric hospital in Raleigh. By 1875, an estimated 700 North Carolinians were classified as “insane” and not receiving proper care. One hospital thus proved insufficient to meet the needs of the State’s mentally ill. Therefore, on March 20, 1875, the General Assembly voted to provide $75,000 to establish a second state hospital. Four western North Carolina cities, Statesville, Hickory, Asheville, and Morganton, competed to become the home for the institution that was to be known in its early years as the Western North Carolina Insane Asylum. Morganton was selected.

Gifts and purchases resulted in 263 acres being acquired by the State in 1875. Work began almost immediately. As an economy measure, 50 convicts were released from penitentiaries and brought to Morganton to help make bricks for the hospital’s first building. The brick contractor was responsible for the feeding, safekeeping, and return of the convicts. Realizing that the building under construction would not provide adequate space and due to insufficient funding to expand its size, the General Assembly appropriated an additional $60,000 in 1877 for another wing. Five years later, in December 1882, the Avery Building and its south wing were completed. Dr. Patrick Livingston Murphy was hired as the first superintendent, a position in which he served for 25 years. Click here for more...