Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

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{{FAformat
|Title= Norfolk State Hospital
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|Title= Bangor State Hospital
|Image= Norfolk_Neb_SH.jpg
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|Image= Bangor1.png
 
|Width= 150px
 
|Width= 150px
|Body= The Norfolk State Hospital was opened for the reception of patients February 15, 1888, when 43 female patients and 54 male patients were transferred from the Hospital for the Insane at Lincoln, Neb. In the late fall of 1901 a fire occurred, which destroyed most of this building. It was rebuilt on the cottage plan, so that there are now three cottages constructed of brick and two of stone, besides the one wing of the old asylum building erected before the fire, which was repaired and reconstructed. Besides the above there is one brick building used for offices and quarters for officers. Dr. Kelley was the first superintendent, but as the hospital was destroyed by fire in the fall of 1901, there are no records showing the names and terms of service of the different superintendents and assistants prior to that time.
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|Body= The Eastern Maine Insane Hospital was opened on July 1, 1901. It was built on a pastoral hill named 'Hepatica Hill' for its flowers overlooking the city of Bangor and the Penobscot River. Pine trees were planted around all of the driveways on the campus and have since grown to enormous sizes.
  
After the fire when the hospital was rebuilt Dr. J. M. Alden was appointed superintendent March 15, 1905, and resigned on October 8, 1906. Dr. F. S. Nicholson was appointed assistant May 20, 1905, and resigned August 1, 1906, when Dr. H. D. Singer was appointed to take his place. Dr. G. A. Young was appointed superintendent October 8, 1906, and served until February 1, 1909. Dr. Singer resigned as first assistant August 15, 1907, and was succeeded by Dr. G. W. Dishong. Dr. Ernest Kelley was appointed second assistant December 28, 1907. Dr. J. P. Percival was appointed superintendent February 1, 1909, and served until February 1, 1911. Dr. W. D. Guttery was appointed first assistant February 1, 1909, and served until June 1, 1911. Dr. Ernest Kelley resigned May 26, 1910, and was succeeded by Dr. L. M. Lombard, who served until November 10, 1910, and he in turn was succeeded by Dr. H. M. Newman November 10, 1910, who served until February 1, 1911.  [[Norfolk State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
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Within five days of opening in 1901, 145 patients were transferred from the Maine Insane Hospital in Augusta to the Bangor location. Patients were generally committed to the hospital by their community peers, such as town selectmen, family, etc.
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Patients worked the fields, raised livestock, manned the laundry, sewing room and kitchen as part of their "treatment." This made the hospital self-sufficient and any excesses were sold at market to pay additional costs, until 1973 when the case of Sonder vs. Brennan went to court and it was determined that patients in public institutions could not work without being paid.
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The name of the hospital changed in 1913 to Bangor State Hospital and then eventually to Bangor Mental Health Institute in the early 70's. The highest patient census was in 1970 with 1,200 patients; however, with a concerted downsizing effort in the 70's, the census fell to 470 in 1974. There were approximately 300 patients through much of the 80's.  [[Bangor State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
 
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Revision as of 04:15, 9 January 2022

Featured Article Of The Week

Bangor State Hospital


Bangor1.png

The Eastern Maine Insane Hospital was opened on July 1, 1901. It was built on a pastoral hill named 'Hepatica Hill' for its flowers overlooking the city of Bangor and the Penobscot River. Pine trees were planted around all of the driveways on the campus and have since grown to enormous sizes.

Within five days of opening in 1901, 145 patients were transferred from the Maine Insane Hospital in Augusta to the Bangor location. Patients were generally committed to the hospital by their community peers, such as town selectmen, family, etc.

Patients worked the fields, raised livestock, manned the laundry, sewing room and kitchen as part of their "treatment." This made the hospital self-sufficient and any excesses were sold at market to pay additional costs, until 1973 when the case of Sonder vs. Brennan went to court and it was determined that patients in public institutions could not work without being paid.

The name of the hospital changed in 1913 to Bangor State Hospital and then eventually to Bangor Mental Health Institute in the early 70's. The highest patient census was in 1970 with 1,200 patients; however, with a concerted downsizing effort in the 70's, the census fell to 470 in 1974. There were approximately 300 patients through much of the 80's. Click here for more...