Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

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|Title= Weston State Hospital
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|Title= Nevada State Hospital
|Image= Westsh.jpg
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|Body= This was West Virginia's first public institution. Its construction was begun by the State of Virginia before the separation of West Virginia from the mother state, the first appropriation having been made by the Legislature of Virginia, March 22, 1858. The institution was opened October 22, 1859, when nine patients were brought from Ohio, where they had been in temporary care awaiting the completion of the hospital. Dr. R. Hills, formerly of the Central Ohio Insane Asylum, was made superintendent and Dr. N. B. Barnes, assistant.
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|Body= Nevada State Hospital was established in 1885; it was the third asylum in Missouri. The first building to be built was the distinctive Kirkbride main building. Over the years the building lost most of its distinctive features and ornamentation. Originally called Lunatic Asylum Number 3, the State Hospital's first building opened on October 17, 1889. The Second Empire style main building was the single largest public building in Missouri at the time of its construction. The asylum was physically self-sufficient from the beginning. Spread out across 520 acres, it had its own water supply, laundry facilities, power plant, and telephone systems, as well as gardens, a lake, greenhouses, a dairy, a hennery, and a hog farm, all of which aided in the production of food stuffs and provided occupational therapy for inmates. In addition to the main building, the complex contained numerous support buildings, structures, and outbuildings, including an ice plant, power plant, cannery, fire engine house, carpenter shop, barns, and silos.
  
In the first years of its history the institution was encompassed with many difficulties. Not only were there financial troubles, but Confederate soldiers in a raid appropriated the blankets belonging to the patients, and in a second raid a ward was destroyed. The people of Weston very generously came to the rescue and contributed their own blankets to fill the temporary needs, public acknowledgment of which was made by the superintendent in his report. In 1868 the population of the hospital was 40; since that date there has been a continual increase in the number of inmates, and a corresponding increase in the appropriation for running expenses, until at the present time the population of the institution is 1023.  [[Weston State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
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During the late 1930s, the Missouri State Hospital Number 3 facilities expanded with the construction of new buildings to address overcrowded conditions. Concurrent with the construction of the Infirmary Building for acute care patients, the state built a Clinic Building to the north of the Infirmary Building to house diagnostic intake facilities and donnitory and treatment space for non-acute/chronic care patients. Another new facility on the hospital grounds was an employee dormitory. These improvements marked the most significant physical growth of the institution in the twentieth century.  [[Nevada State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
 
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Revision as of 02:38, 1 May 2022

Featured Article Of The Week

Nevada State Hospital


Nevadakirk 0.jpg

Nevada State Hospital was established in 1885; it was the third asylum in Missouri. The first building to be built was the distinctive Kirkbride main building. Over the years the building lost most of its distinctive features and ornamentation. Originally called Lunatic Asylum Number 3, the State Hospital's first building opened on October 17, 1889. The Second Empire style main building was the single largest public building in Missouri at the time of its construction. The asylum was physically self-sufficient from the beginning. Spread out across 520 acres, it had its own water supply, laundry facilities, power plant, and telephone systems, as well as gardens, a lake, greenhouses, a dairy, a hennery, and a hog farm, all of which aided in the production of food stuffs and provided occupational therapy for inmates. In addition to the main building, the complex contained numerous support buildings, structures, and outbuildings, including an ice plant, power plant, cannery, fire engine house, carpenter shop, barns, and silos.

During the late 1930s, the Missouri State Hospital Number 3 facilities expanded with the construction of new buildings to address overcrowded conditions. Concurrent with the construction of the Infirmary Building for acute care patients, the state built a Clinic Building to the north of the Infirmary Building to house diagnostic intake facilities and donnitory and treatment space for non-acute/chronic care patients. Another new facility on the hospital grounds was an employee dormitory. These improvements marked the most significant physical growth of the institution in the twentieth century. Click here for more...