Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

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|Title= New Jersey Sanitorium for Tuberculosis Diseases
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|Title= Toledo State Hospital
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|Image= Toledo11.jpg
 
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|Body= In 1907, New Jersey opened its only state owned and operated sanatorium in Glen Gardner. It was intended to be a model institution, providing individual and public health benefits to an expected 500 case annually. Described at the time as “largely educational in character, which would give a practical demonstration of up-to-date methods of treating .... tuberculosis”, the facility treated more than 10,000 between 1907 and 1929.
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|Body= Designed by prominent Toledo architect, Edward O. Fallis, the Toledo Asylum for the Insane opened for occupancy in 1888, with Dr. Henry A. Tobey as superintendent. It was built on 150 acres of land located at the corner of Arlington and Detroit Avenues, and its design was based upon the cottage model which was a revolutionary concept at the time. There were thirty four buildings, twenty of which were pavilions or “cottages” that housed the “less extreme cases” of insane individuals, while six buildings--two infirm wards, two hospitals, and two strong wards--housed those considered more “critically insane” or “incurable.” The grounds also featured man-made lagoons, an administration building, a farm, an auditorium, a greenhouse, and a chapel. The maximum capacity of the entire project could house 1,800 patients.
  
The sanatorium's mission was broadened and the effects of long-term care assessed by the 1920s. The scope was broadened to incorporate cases in all levels of severity, regardless of the original intention to only treat "incipients, or 'curables'". The sanatorium's treatment remained reatively unchanged until the middle of the twentieth century when medication became the prevailing treatment. In 1950, the sanatorium broaden it's scope once again, but this to to include all chest diseases, and the name was changed to the New Jersey Hospital for Chest Diseases.
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The “cottage system,” as it became known, was conceived by General Roeliff Brinkerhoff, the founder of the Ohio State Archeological and Historical Society, who believed in abolishing the use of mechanical restraints in the treatment of the insane, and housing them in cottages to allow them the feelings of self-worth and independence while under the care of the state. The Mission Statement and Philosophy of the Asylum read, “To many the subject of caring for the insane is…a mystery. The secret of their care and keeping them contented is to have them lead as normal a life as possible, with good clean, healthy surroundings, plenty of nourishing food, and fresh air.The Asylum began moving patients off of the property in the early 1970s, and the buildings were destroyed in the early 1990s. Northwest Ohio Psychiatirc Hospital (NOPH), located on the same site, is the current treatment center and psychiatric hospital in Toledo and is owned and operated by the state of Ohio.  [[Toledo State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
 
 
In 1977, the hospital changed its name again to the Senator Garret W. Hagedorn Gero-Psychiatric Hospital as it focused on its new calling as a state nursing home and eventually a 288-bed psychiatric hospital. The hospital’s premier location high up on a mountaintop with 600 acres of provided inpatient, comprehensive psychiatric treatment for adult patients. The hospital stated as its mission “to provide quality interdisciplinary psychiatric services that maximize potential and community reintegration within a safe and caring environment. [[New Jersey Sanitorium for Tuberculosis Diseases|Click here for more...]]
 
 
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Revision as of 04:18, 26 December 2021

Featured Article Of The Week

Toledo State Hospital


Toledo11.jpg

Designed by prominent Toledo architect, Edward O. Fallis, the Toledo Asylum for the Insane opened for occupancy in 1888, with Dr. Henry A. Tobey as superintendent. It was built on 150 acres of land located at the corner of Arlington and Detroit Avenues, and its design was based upon the cottage model which was a revolutionary concept at the time. There were thirty four buildings, twenty of which were pavilions or “cottages” that housed the “less extreme cases” of insane individuals, while six buildings--two infirm wards, two hospitals, and two strong wards--housed those considered more “critically insane” or “incurable.” The grounds also featured man-made lagoons, an administration building, a farm, an auditorium, a greenhouse, and a chapel. The maximum capacity of the entire project could house 1,800 patients.

The “cottage system,” as it became known, was conceived by General Roeliff Brinkerhoff, the founder of the Ohio State Archeological and Historical Society, who believed in abolishing the use of mechanical restraints in the treatment of the insane, and housing them in cottages to allow them the feelings of self-worth and independence while under the care of the state. The Mission Statement and Philosophy of the Asylum read, “To many the subject of caring for the insane is…a mystery. The secret of their care and keeping them contented is to have them lead as normal a life as possible, with good clean, healthy surroundings, plenty of nourishing food, and fresh air.” The Asylum began moving patients off of the property in the early 1970s, and the buildings were destroyed in the early 1990s. Northwest Ohio Psychiatirc Hospital (NOPH), located on the same site, is the current treatment center and psychiatric hospital in Toledo and is owned and operated by the state of Ohio. Click here for more...