Difference between revisions of "Enid Springs Sanatorium"

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Latest revision as of 03:34, 23 July 2022

Enid Springs Sanatorium
Opened 1915
Current Status Demolished
Building Style Single Plan
Location Enid, OK
Architecture Style Plantation style
Alternate Names
  • Enid Springs Sanatorium and Baths
  • Enid Springs Sanatorium and Hospital
  • Enid Spring Sanatorium and Hospital
  • Enid Government Springs Sanatorium



History[edit]

The Enid Spring Sanatorium and Baths was founded in 1915 by Dr. G.A. Boyle and Dr T.B. Hinsen as a 12-bed hospital. The location was 502 E Oklahoma Ave, Enid, OK. In 1921, Boyle retired, leaving Hinson in charge. By 1924 the sanatorium boasted a 50-bed total (30 of which were private rooms), and 10 nurses. That year they treated 550 patients, helped birth 38 babies, and reported 16 deaths.

The hospital was purchased in 1937 by the Adorers of the Blood of Christ of Wichita, Kansas. Hinson died in 1938, and the hospital was renamed St. Mary's Springs Hospital. The hospital trained nurses at Enid High School from 1915 to 1951, and at Phillips University from 1971 to 1973.

was leased by Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) from 1984 to 1995. The Sisters of Mercy Health System, St. Louis, Missouri, purchased the hospital in 1995 and made it a part of the Mercy Health System Oklahoma.

The original sanatorium buildings are long gone, and the Government Springs Public Park now stands on the grounds which are directly next to the modern day St. Mercy Hospital.

Images[edit]